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Single Metal Door and Frame Complete Unit
 

Metal Door and Metal Frame Complete Unit

Single Metal Door and Frame Complete Unit

 
Manufacturer: ABS
Price: $747.39
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Standard - ships within 14 business days.
 
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Questions and Answers
Q: I have some doors and side panels that need replaced and the hinge locations apear to be Kewanee by the chart I have. Is there a way I can send pics and sizes to see if they are available?
A: Please do. Send your photos to the email address on the Contact Us page here:

https://absupply.net/about_us.aspx

Q: We talked about a metal frame that is 2" wide to the left and right of the door.

Does that mean if we have a 2-6 door, the outside of the frame will be 34".

We are fitting these 2 doors in between 2 houses and the owner wants to maximize door width, but I have to make sure we can still fit the frame in that space. We have a masonry structure on one side and a combination of wood and masonry on the other structure. The other thing I mentioned was that we will install wood framing to the exist structures to give us something to attach the door frame to.

What method do you recommend in attaching the metal door frame to the wood framing? Some sort of large wood screw? Can you provide the fasteners, holes and dimpling in the frame?

If my dimension assumption in the 1st paragraph is correct, please price a 2-6 x 7-0 and a 2-10 x 7-0 door, frame, and all the parts you priced the first time.

A: I will happily quote these doors for you. I can quoted this with 2" jamb faces or I can quote the jamb faces as custom, say 1" (this will allow a maximizing of door width). Are you interested in a true "maximizing" of door width by considering custom jambs, or is the 4" less than RO for nominal door width good enough? There will be follow up questions but once we have this completed, we will arrive at precisely what you are looking for.

Please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: Give me an idea how much more cost would be added by going to 1" jamb faces and the added time to get the custom frames. Timing is important for us. I would like to get these doors in about a week to 1 1/2 weeks. I the 1" frames add time, the "4" less than RO" is going to be good enough. Can you get this pricing on the 2 doors to me today? I want to put this to bed with the owner over the weekend.
A: The custom profile material, where cost is less a concern than lead time, is typically 2 - weeks to ship and typically another week in transit.

I have sent a quote to your email for the 2 - openings as discussed.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take pride in our technical expertise so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: If ordering doors on your site, can they be picked up at you Prospect Heights location to avoid the steep shipping charges?
A: In general the answer is yes. What specifically are you looking for?

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take pride in our technical expertise, as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: Please see attached hardware & keying schedules: a) What does this code, “HNTCB” mean? b) I’m not a hardware guy and I don't know what "1" Bitted means. Does it mean that temporary constriction cores are provided? Can you help me out AND thanks for any help you can lend… Best Regards,
A: In this context, HNYCB is certainly an abbreviation for Honeycomb

1 bitted means the cylinder is pinned all number 1 pins (and naturally the key is cut all ones therefore th bitting for those cylinders would be 111111).

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise, as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: How do you specify insulation in Single metal door w/metal frame?
A: Great Question. All Metal doors on this page will be Polystyrene core. Other cores are available such as honeycomb, polyurethane, steel stiffened. mineral rock wool, temperature rise/mineral fiberboard. If you have a requirement for one of these optional cores, please reach out to our sales department for a quote.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise, as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: Rich, My house was built in 1957. An exterior doorway has a steel door jamb with two hinges that are built into the jamb. They appear to have been installed in a slot behind the face of the jamb. Jamb is set in a brick wall with mortar filled in between the bricks and jamb. The top hinge (and the area of the jamb where it was attached) has literally torn loose from the jamb and must be replaced. I can not find any information (or products or person) that describes how to replace hinges and repair the jamb in this scenario. This doorway is currently unusable and must be repaired as soon as possible. Do you have any products or information I can use? Can you help? Thanks, Pat [removed]
A: Pat - thank you for the email. I have a short fix in mind using off the shelf hardware and a longer, more difficult, but more elegant fix in mind. Please email me a handful of photos of the door, frame and comprised area. I will detail the options I see best suited for your application.
Q: How do I install a steel frame - I emailed you photos.
A: Robert - I received your photos and have prepared this video response -

Click Here

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise, as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with. If this answer was helpful - please consider following us on Twitter

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Q: Rich, Sherwin Williams attitude grey. I’m sure I read some place for the manufacture warranty you had indicated a certain gloss. But I’m unable to find this. Can you advise Thanks Julie
A: Thank you very much for the email and I very much appreciate you asking it a good question prior to proceeding with painting the door.

First the manufacturers warranty for the doors you purchased is here:

Download File

However there is very specific information regarding gloss paint on the surface of hollow metal doors and frames.

According to ANSI/SDI A250.8-2014 Revision of ANSI/SDI A250.8-2003 as published on The Steel Door Institute site:

Aesthetics

The production of steel doors and frames relies on a variety of manufacturing processes including spot welding, projection welding, arc welding ground smooth, grinding, filling, etc. These processes may result in a show-through after application of finished paint. These characteristics are inherent in production and are not to be considered as manufacturing defects.

The show-through characteristics increase as the paint gloss increases. This standard recommends a maximum paint gloss rating of 20% reflectance, measured using a 60° gloss meter, which should be suitable for most applications. Translucent paints may emphasize show-through characteristics and their use is not recommended.*

This document is to be followed even in the instance where the manufacturers warranty lacks this secific language.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise (something Amazon can not provide) as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with. If this answer was helpful -

please consider following us on Twitter

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or liking our page on Facebook

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* ANSI/SDI A250.8-2014 Revision of ANSI/SDI A250.8-2003
Click Here

Q: Is the primer oil based or water based?
A: Julie - the primer on the doors and frames for your order, as manufacturered Karpen Steel Products as seen here:

Click Here

is Oil based primer.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise (something Amazon can not provide) as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

Click Here

if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with. If this answer was helpful -

please consider following us on Twitter

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or liking our page on Facebook

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Q: What is the maximum glass light size on a 3 hour (180 minute) fire rated door?
A: Maximum glass light sizes for 3 hour fire doors is as follows:

Wire glass: not approved for use in 3 hour fire doors.

Ceramic glass: UL & ITS/WH allow one (1) light with 100 square inches (.06 square meters) maximum of glass is permitted on 3 hour Maximum width of 12" (305 mm) or height of 33" (838 mm).

L, B, & T series doors if Firelite or other 3 hour listed glazing material is used.

Some local building codes do not recognize the use of glass lights in 3 hour fire doors.

Historically, a 3 hour fire door could not include a glass light.

Recent code changes and fire tests have allowed for the use of listed glass lights designs.

Multiple glass lights are not allowed on 3 hour fire doors.

Q: What is a KD frame?
A: Knock Down (KD) frames: KD frames are designed, manufactured and supplied with integral miters which include all notches, interlocking corner tabs and slots to allow for field assembly and do not require corer welding prior to installation. When KD frames are used, corner welding is optional and when specified. The terms KD, 3 - piece knocked down, Knock Down, Knocked Down and "break-down" are used interchangeably. Practically all frames can be ordered as knocked down frames most notable with the exception of 12 guage frames (which must be factory welded).

While frame anchors must always be specified, it is generally inferred that when someone speaks of or refers to a frame as being “knocked down” they are inferring that they want the frame to include the integrated anchoring system typically known as “drywall anchors” and more often known within the industry has compression anchors and an example of this anchor type can be seen here:

Click Here

Compression anchors are always welded into the rear side of the jamb and always have the net result of a specific rough opening requirement in relationship to the nominal door size. Most typically the rough opening size, however not always and you must always confirm with your supplier prior to framing walls, is that you would increase the rough opening by ¾” on each vertical side and ¾” at the header meaning a 3 foot by 7 foot nominal door size would have a rough opening requirement of 37-½” by 84-¾”

Q: What is a welded frame?
A: A welded frame is one that will start life out as a knock down or three piece frame. What turns it into a welded frame is that the distributor or manufacturer or point-of-purchase will provide the assembly service for you - taking a frame that is in multiple pieces and assembling it to one unified piece.

There are different definitions that qualify a frame to be assembled such as a frame that is literally just assembled where the tab and slot construction of the frame, inherent to a masonry type frame, is completed where the distributor will connect the pieces together and at least provide them in a sense where they are now in one piece. If a client were to order a frame as a knock down the prior mentioned assembly is always performed prior to installation. The more common way to classify a frame as welded is to take that same prior step and then weld the frame behind or in the throat of the frame so that the pieces cannot come disassembled however this method wood leave the mitre of the frame intact or visible. A step beyond this would be to take that same frame that's been assembled and then welded with weld points behind or in the throat of the frame but then also weld continuously the miter that is in the face of the frame and on all four corners, if it's a three-sided frame, and then grind that weld down smooth or flush, sand it and then paint it that will give it a seamless look where the miters have been welded closed. This of course is the most common way to do this as well and if you hear the terminology “Full face Welded and Ground Smooth” this method is what is being referred to. A third way where it's called saw cut and welded where the manufacturer generally will take pieces and then cut them on their bandsaw or some manufacturing piece of equipment and then literally weld the frame continuously from the miter on the face to the rabbit in the back and dress the weld properly - some people consider this a more complete or total method of welding however it's only engaged at the manufacturing process when you are creating custom frames using pre-manufactured materials in my experience.

It is always advantageous to have the frame(s) welded prior to installation regardless of who provides the assembly / welding service (assuming the individual(s) is qualified) as the potential for the opening to stay square is significantly improved over the life expectancy of the doorway.

However requiring welded frames at a project will specifically alter the course of construction in any given job because a welded frame needs to be in place typically at the time, or before initial wall construction occurs (an advantage of having the frames on site prior to wall construction is that the contractor can confirm accuracy but also that there is no delay in the tradesman coming on the job site to proceed with wall construction), whereas a 3-piece knockdown frame is done after the wall construction has occurred. Always plan accordingly to allow the distributor or manufacturer ample time to produce welded frames and have them arrive at the job site prior to wall construction occurring.

It can be also understood that welding frames are used in all instances when cost and scheduling are not an obstacle and that 3-piece knockdown frames are generally ordered when cost and timing is not favorable to the flow of construction. Speaking plainly you do not want a 3-piece knockdown frame on the job site when your budget and schedule will allow for a welded frame It's not down frames are known to come out of square in a short amount of time.

I offer as proof of this of when you enter your favorite coffee shop and you can see that there is a compression anchor installed at the top of the frame (a telltale sign that the frame initially was a knockdown 3 piece drywall type) and you'll notice that within one or two years of initial construction that the frame will no longer be square and plumb, and that the door will be making improper contact with the top of the jamb. There is no elegant way to mitigate this type of problem which will lead to damage to the door the hardware and when adorn frame no longer work and an improperly functioning door opening is more prone to vandalism or abuse as the user is not necessarily concerned with the healthy operation of the door.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise (something Amazon can not provide) as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with. If this answer was helpful -

please consider following us on Twitter

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or liking our page on Facebook

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Thank you for your consideration.

Q: What is a plaster guard?
A: A plaster guard is a piece of metal that has been welded behind a hardware preparation in a steel frame - most commonly the hinge and the strike but a plaster guard can be of any size and shape required to close off the preparation in a steel frame from the intrusion of any of the wall material from interfering with the operation and installation of the hardware and also from material of the wall construction working its way and exiting out through the frame through those Hardware preparations.

A plaster guard is also primarily used when a welded (or 3 - piece frame) frame is put in place and concrete and mortar is used with the appropriate anchors during installation. The plaster guard prevents the intrusion of the grout and concrete from interfering with the preparations in the steel frame for the hardware. Imagine for a moment that if you installed a steel frame onto a new construction cement block wall and used concrete/mortar/grout with corrugated T anchors - without the plaster guard being properly in place that grout would certainly fill all of the drilled and tapped areas in the hinge reinforcing play where the hinge would ultimately need to attach to making it practically impossible to attach the screws into the tapped holes.

One interesting thing that we sometimes will do is if that there is a steel frame that's going to be installed and there has been no plaster guard made available such as what you would see with a continuous geared hinge installation we would take a three-quarter inch thick or so piece of rigid insulation and simply tape it behind the frame before the installation of the frame to the wall such that the grout is eliminated from intruding into that area where we would ultimately have to drill and tap holes for fastening hardware.

A plaster guard is also known as a Dust Cover Box, Masonry Guard, Mortar Guard, Plaster Guard; Grout Guard.

The answer to this question is not to be considered complete nor was there any research done and was answered just using the first most obvious and common applications of what a plaster guard is.

It is typical and common that drywall type frames do not have plaster guards installed because there is no function of grout or mortar involved in a typical drywall frame - also known as interior - wall Construction.

Q: Hi Rich can you please quote these doors and frame, swing clear hinges , brushed door sweeps,astragal and cover plate? 5'8" x 811/2 . I believe it was Ceco but I guess it can be anything?

Photos here:

Click Here

Click Here

Click Here

Click Here

Thanks Jim any questions give me a call.

A: Jim - our conversation led us in a direction earlier where you find it often where you are replacing doors and frames because of a top hinge failure in a swing clear application.

I have sent over a quote to your email but I substituted for continuous geared swing clear hinges for full mortise swing clear hinges per your photos as I believe you are better off installing continuous geared swing clear hinges right from the initial installation because as we discussed there are not reinforcing top pivots such as the Markar B1923 US2G Full Surface Reinforcing Pivot as seen here:

Click Here

When you need to mitigate that sort of problem and have a swing clear hinge.

Q: Hi Rich you mentioned that there was some reinforcing to do for the Roton hinge - can you send me some installation instructions so I will know what I am looking at as far as time.
A: The mention of reinforcing is done internally in the steel door and frame (nothing you will need to do additional) which means that you're not going to have just the thin edge of the door to screw too but there's going to be additional steel welded inside of the construction of the door as well as in the back side of the frame. Translation you're going to have a lot of steel to drill through to hang those hinges properly however the hinges are going to include 12/24 screws with a self drilling point. The additional labor is going to come in the fact then I would probably calculate an additional 3 hours to simply contend with the fact that you're going to have rather than 24 screws to install per door you're going to have probably double that.
Q: Does it add to the cost of the frame and would you agree it might be better to set the hinges before hand to save some time in the field right?
A: I priced it that way - you are all set. Regarding attaching the hinge until the frame is set and you're actually hanging a door so that you can margin off of the actual installation of the frame. Having said that if you were to take the unit and in your shop build it as a complete prehung or the frame is welded and the two doors are hung in the frame on the hinges and you had welded reinforcements at the bottom of the frame that you would remove after installation that might make a lot of difference once in the field but you know as well as I do that when you get the frame set to the wall you kind of margin the frame to the door and the door to the frame type scenario. I remember about 15 years or maybe 20 years ago when I first installed a continuous hinge my very first one ever it took me only one hour and I have never done it before it's really super simple to put one of these in your just going to drill lots of holes with those self drilling screws is the bottom line I say Jump Right In the water's fine - LOL
Q: What is 5, 10 and equal (NAAMM/HMMA) hinge spacing?
A: "5, 10 and equal" Hinge Spacing: The industry terminology which usually refers to the Custom (NAAMM/HMMA) Door hinge locations.

This location dictates:

  • Top Hinge - located 5" from the underside of the frame head (top of door opening) to the top of the top hinge.
  • Bottom Hinge - located 10" from the bottom of the frame (bottom of door opening) to the bottom of the bottom hinge.
  • Middle (center) Hinge(s) - all other hinges are equally spaced.

We can supply "5, 10 and equal" hinge spacing as an option when specified.

Q: How are Butt Hinges located?
A: Certain manufacturers locates all butt hinges from the top of the door to the centerline of each hinge as standard practice:

  • Locating hinges to the center line of the hinge keeps all hinge locations the same (at a given door height) regardless of hinge size.
  • All variations in door height will vary the hinge locations accordingly.

If top or bottom of hinge locations are required:

  • Special (non-standard) orders can be submitted but the distributor is responsible for coordinating any changes in hinge sizes.
  • In this situation, doors and frames prepared for 5" hinges have a different location than 4 1/2" hinges.

Industry Hinge Locations - Standard (SDI) versus Custom (NAAMM/HMMA):

  • Standard (SDI) hinge locations are located based on the centerline of the hinge.
  • Custom (NAAMM/HMMA) hinge locations are located based on the top or bottom of the hinge.
Q: What types of steel are used in commercial steel doors?
A: The types of steel that are used in hollow metal door and frame construction can be reviewed here:

  • Cold Rolled Steel (CRS)
is suitable for most interior applications, is uncoated steel and requires a coat of primer.

  • Galvannealed Steel (A) is basic steel coated with an iron-zinc alloy. It provides excellent corrosion protection when combined with a coating of quality prime paint and is adequate for most interior and exterior applications. SDI recommends use of the A Type, both A40 and A60, for primer adhesion. A60 is superior to A40 for inhibiting rust.

  • Galvanized Steel (G) is basic steel treated with a full zinc alloy. It provides superior rust protection but has poor adhesion properties for prime or finish paint. Even though galvanized (G90) steel is often specified for causal areas and areas of excessive corrosion, it is not recommend because of inferior primer adhesion properties, poor welding capabilities and excessive weld show.
  • Q: How many compression anchors are provide per jamb on the drywall frames?
    A: Generally speaking for drywall frames with integrated compression anchors for jamb depths up to and including 9" - one (1) compression anchor is furnished per jamb

    for jamb depths over 9" - two (2) compression anchor are furnished per jamb on the same horizontal center line.

    The compression anchor in the jamb soffits approximately 4" down from the head on each jamb regardless of door opening height.

    Q: What is the minimum dimension from the edge of the door to a glass light cutout?
    A: Generally speaking, and this definition does not work in all instances so consult your door manufacturer, we can advise general guidelines as follows:

    Minimum dimensions to cutouts for glass lights:

    • Vertical edge of door to edge of cutout = 5 29/32"
    • Top of door to top of cutout = 6"
    • Bottom of door to bottom of cutout = 10"

    Reinforcing channels are recommended for the following applications:
    • Required on fire rated openings
    • Required on all B-series doors
    • When cutout exceeds 36"
    • Abusive applications
    • Reinforcing channels will be installed at the factory when required or requested.

    Doors can be prepared for cutouts either at the factory or in the distributors shop provided the distributor is a "licensed machiner"for field installed glass light kits.
    Q: Can Drywall Slip-on frames be welded?
    A: Drywall Slip-on frames are recommended and designed to be installed as KD (Knock Down) assemblies and not recommended to be welded (SUA). If a DW-Series or K-Series is welded prior to installation it is no longer considered a "Drywall Slip-on" frame due to the installation process.

    Universal anchors are designed to be field snapped into MU-Series frames but will also snap into Drywall Slip-on frames and is only done:

  • If required by the architect
  • A distributor can use a DW of K series frame and convert it to a MU-Series frame construction. This would only be recommended if the jobsite requirements are critical.
  • In those applications Steelcraft recommends using the MU-Series frame which has a complete line of wall anchors.
  • Q: Can you provide frame installation instructions?
    A: It is always recommended to point installers to the industry installation manuals which are very comprehensive and are ANSI documents:

  • SDI (Steel Door Institute) installation manual can be found here: Download File
  • NAAMM/HMMA (Hollow Metal Manufacturers" Association) installation manual can be found here: Download File
  • Q: Can "toed in" or "toed out" jambs be adjusted?
    A: This condition (toed in or toed out jambs) is usually not found until the door is installed.

    Frames which have toed in or toed out jambs have been installed out of tolerance. It is the responsibility of the installing contractor to install all material in accordance with SDI or HMMA installation standards and tolerances. Frames which are installed out of the published tolerances must be adjusted or replaced by the installing contractor.

    Conventional Frames: - These frames are installed during the wall construction process and anchored/fastened directly to the wall construction. When toed in or toed out jambs are found:

  • Masonry wall applications - Frame usually must be removed and/or replaced
  • Stud wall applications - If the wall board is not attached, the frame may be able to be re-anchored and adjusted. If the wall board has been installed the frames usually must be removed and new frames installed.

    Drywall Slip-on Frames - These frames can usually adjusted by the installing contractor. Recommended adjustment processes are found on pages 16 thru 17 in SDI-122 which can be viewed here:

    Click Here

  • Q: Can out of plumb (twisted) frames be adjusted?
    A: Out of plumb (also referred to as twisted) frames usually cannot be adjusted.

    "Out of Plumb or Twisted frames (or jambs)" is a condition created by improper wall construction and/or improper installation and anchoring methods. The faces of the two jambs (hinge and strike) are not in the same imaginary plane as the door face. This can be checked by using a level and/or plumb bob. Frames do not have adjustments when it comes to “twist”.

    The “twist” condition is generally caused by the wall conditions. The frame jamb faces are prevented from being set in the same plane because the base of the walls (the bottom at each jamb) are out of plane to begin with.

    It is the responsibility of the installing contractor to install walls and  all door/frame material in accordance with SDI or HMMA installation standards and tolerances. Frames which are installed in out of plumb walls which exceed the published tolerances must be adjusted or replaced by the installing contractor. More information on "out of plumb" frames in found on pages 11 in SDI-122 which can be viewed here:

    Download File

    Q: What is a Hospital Stop?
    A: Hospital Stops are located at the bottom of the frame jambs and/or mullions. The integral door stops are terminates above floor line and is closed with a 45° or 90° angle to facilitate cleaning at the floor line. Frames with Hospital stops are used in Health Care facilities.

    Also referred to as:

  • Terminated Stops
  • Sanitary Stops
  • Cutoff Stops

  • Q: What is the purpose for using a 12 gage head reinforcement?
    A: When there is concern for the weight of overhead wall construction, or, when multiple surface applied hardware components are being used. This continuous channel has the ability to spread and transfer the load to the floor through the jambs while providing the necessary thickness for thread engagement.

  • Note: Hollow metal frames, with or without the optional continuous head reinforcement, are not designed as or intended to be a load bearing member of wall construction.

  • Continuous head reinforcement channels are used at the specifiers' discretion to safe guard against head sag in door openings usually specified in frame over 48" in width. The 12 gage head reinforcement is 1" less that the nominal head size, i.e., a head for a 6'0" pair of doors would require a 71" long continuous head reinforcement.

  • Welded into frame head
  • Minimum 2" face dimension
  • Length, other than standard must be specified
  • Q: What causes excessive pinhole rust to start showing up on steel frames?
    A: Caution must be used in investigating this problem - In most cases, excessive field rusting of products is caused by improper storage at the jobsite. That situation must be validated prior to refusing any field repair. A thorough onsite inspection of the material must be conducted. Most likely the frames have been stored on site for several months or through an entire cycle of seasons is what has lead to this condition.

    Remove frame and replace with new products:

  • Alternate – If frame is not rusted through, grind down rust to bare metal, re-prime and finish paint per paint manufacturer’s instructions.
  • The manufacturer warranty will not cover this repair if it is determined the fault of on site storage or abuse.
  • Q: How many P & D (Pierce and Dimple) holes are in a frame?
    A: The following are quantities of EMA anchors (pierce and dimples) based on range of frame height:

    Download File

    These quantities are the same for both label and non-label openings. For jamb depths 3" through 9 1/8" frames have a single dimple, for jamb depths 9 1/4" and above there are two (2) located side by side at each location.

    The bottom dimple is located at 2 1/2" from bottom of frame, this eliminates the need for an additional base anchor.

    For labelled applications - These P & D are solely designed for use into masonry walls systems, attached using 3/8" diameter expansion bolt. Installing into any other wall assembly using any other attachment must be approved by others, if label must approved by AHJ.

    Q: Where is the Fire Label located on a door and a frame?
    A: Fire labels (UL, ITS/WHI or FM) are located as follows:

    Butt Hinges and Pivots:

  • On the doors the fire label is located on the hinge edge between the top and 2nd hinge preparation.
  • On the frames the fire label is located on the hinge jamb between the top and 2nd hinge preparation.

    Continuous Hinges:

    Full Mortise Continuous Hinge:

  • On the frame the fire label would be located on the rabbet of head approximately 8" from the hinge jamb.
  • On the door, the label is located in the top channel approximately 8" from the hinge jamb. If a top cap is installed, it must be removed to view the label. On the jobsite, removing the top cap is the responsibility of the building inspector.

    Full Surface Continuous Hinges:

  • On the doors the fire label is located on the hinge edge between the top and 2nd hinge preparation.
  • On the frames the fire label is located on the hinge jamb between the top and 2nd hinge preparation.
  • Q: What is the maximum glass light size on fire rated doors.
    A: Maximum glass light sizes for 3 hour fire doors is as follows:

  • Wire glass - not approved for use in 3 hour fire doors.
  • Ceramic glass - UL & ITS/WH allow one (1) light with 100 square inches (.06 square meters) maximum of glass is permitted on 3 hour Maximum width of 12" (305 mm) or height of 33" (838 mm) on some series of doors if Firelite or other 3 hour listed glazing material is used.

    Some local building codes do not recognize the use of glass lights in 3 hour fire doors:

    Historically, a 3 hour fire door could not include a glass light. Recent code changes and fire tests have allowed for the use of listed glass lights designs:

    Multiple glass lights are not allowed on 3 hour fire doors.

    Maximum glass light size for a 90 minute (1 1/2 hour) door depends on the type of glass being installed.

  • Wire glass = 100 square inches is max exposed glass when wire glass is used. Note - many code are outlawing the use of wire glass due to the hazards of injury from glass breakage.
  • Ceramic glass (FireLite, etc.) = 1296 square inches per light is allowed if used with Firelite or other appropriately listed glazing material. Max width is 36" or height of 54".

    Multiple glass lights: UL listed L-series doors may have multiple lights provide each light does not exceed 1296 square inches of exposed glass area.

  • Q: What does the term Splade Stop mean?
    A: According to Allegion a Splade Stop is equivalent to a Hospital Stop (also called a Cut-Off Stop) and would likely be used is context of a hollow metal frame, can be visualized on the 16'th page od the SDI document as seen here:

    Download File

    on the 10'th page of the HMMA 801-12 document as seen here:

    Download File

    and is defined by HMMA as:

    The stops and soffit on a jamb or mullion at a door opening that are terminated at a specific distance above the floor, and are closed square or at an angle. to facilitate cleaning of the floor. Also referred to as Hospital Stops, Sanitary Vase or Terminated Stop

    Q: What heavy weight hinge do you recommend for a pair of 5x10 steel door on steel frame? Door thickness is 1-3/4”. Each of the 5’x10’ door weigh 375 lbs.
    A: I would not hang the door on hinges - I would use pivots because of the weight. If I had to suggest hinge it would be: BB5006-645-630 And I would use 5 per door As seen here:

    Download File

    In so far as pivots would be concerned I would suggest per door the Rixson:

    1 - L147
    3 - ML19

    as seen here:

    Download File

    Q: Are 4" hinge preparations available?
    A: Yes,

    4" butt hinge preparations are available as an option on hollow metal doors and frames as noted below:

  • Hinge type: square corner with commercial hole pattern. Preparations for radius corner hinges are not available
  • Doors: available on 20 gage doors only.
  • Frames: available on 16 gage frames only.

    Applications:

  • 4" hinges are used in residential applications or in very light duty commercial applications.
  • Commercial applications should be limited to closets and door openings which have little to no opening cycles and/or abuse.
  • Due to the light duty hinge construction of the 4" hinge, door weight must be minimized to a 20 gage hollow metal door or a hollow core wood door.
  • Q: Are 12 guage steel frames available?
    A: Most certainly and in fact we use 12 gauge frames are very often used when we are looking to create an opening that we know automatically will get a substantial amount of volume along with a substantial potential for abusive or vandalistic type behavior.

    Given how thick the steel is when you go to this gauge of frame there are generally some limitations that end up presenting themselves in certain rare instances, such as minimum face dimension requirements, however for standard applications you can count on the availability of a 12 gauge frame - although they are always welded as you would not order a 3-piece knockdown 12 gauge frame. Additionally advantageous about the 12 gauge frame is not only the outrageous durability of the frame but the fact that hinge reinforcements and reinforcements done for other hardware automatically become incredibly substantial.

    I like to advise my clients that if they were going for a 12 gauge frame that I would usually order it galvanized as well because the upcharge from cold rolled steel to galvanized is usually insignificant.

    Q: After an attempted break-in I am considering replacing my door or alternatively how can I increase the security on my existing metal door as seen in the photos here:

    View Image

    View Image

    View Image

    A: It does not appear as if there was anything damaged or anything about the door and frame for your photographs that would require a complete replacement.

    Would you be interested in spending a small amount of money to give yourself an increase in security which would be an offset steel bar that I had discussed with you previously on the new door - I could sell you that offset steel bar that you could apply to your door and give yourself a substantial amount of resistance to break-in and vandalism as seen here:

    View Image

    And a typical 7 ft length can be seen here:

    Click Here

    Q: What's needed to write a door hardware specification?
    A: According to Allegion:

    The following items are needed for Spec Writers to write a door and hardware specification :

    Building code being used

  • Occupancy type or types
  • Occupancy load for any rooms or areas of assembly or educational
  • Electrical rooms with equipment rated 1,200 amperes or more and over 6 feet (1829 mm) wide that contain overcurrent devices, switching devices or control devices
  • Floor plans showing doors, opening numbers, and room names/types
  • Door schedule with opening numbers, door and frame types and elevations, door size (width, height, and thickness), and fire ratings
  • Elevations and details of doors and frames
  • Owner standards for door hardware; including key system (or owner contact so we can assist in gaining their standards or preferences)
  • Security/Access Control requirements (or Security Consultant/Integrator contact so we can assist in coordinating with door hardware)
  • Q: Are 4" hinge preparations available?
    A: Yes, 4" butt hinge preparations are available as an option on hollow metal doors and frames as noted below:

  • Hinge type: square corner with commercial hole pattern. Preparations for radius corner hinges are not available
  • Doors: available on 20 gage doors only.
  • Frames: available on 16 gage frames only.

    Applications:

  • 4" hinges are used in residential applications or in very light duty commercial applications.
  • Commercial applications should be limited to closets and door openings which have little to no opening cycles and/or abuse.
  • Due to the light duty hinge construction of the 4" hinge, door weight must be minimized to a 20 gage hollow metal door or a hollow core wood door.
  • Q: Richard, What is the grade of steel on a standard metal door? Please advise.
    A: Depends on the application -

  • Residential duty would be 20 gauge
  • Standard duty commercial would be 18 gauge
  • Heavy duty commercial or school type applications would be 16 gauge
  • Industrial applications that will take substantial abuse would be 14 gauge

    The industry governing document is here and specifically see page 2:

    Download File

    Please be mindful that this conversation would be incomplete without discussing the way that the edges are treated as wekk as how the core construction will impact the performance as well.

  • Q: Metal gages and conversions.
    A: According to Allegian:

    Gage and gauge are interchangeable terms.

    Gage is an archaic numeric value used to define a range of thickness of material.

  • Gage is no longer used in ANSI standards and has been replaced with “Thickness”.
  • Like many generic terms, gage (or gauge) is ingrained in many vocabularies and still used heavily by architects and our industry.
  • Prior to 1970, sheet steel was referred to by gage. ASTM and ANSI currently do not list gage numbers in their standards but show steel thickness in both decimal and metric equivalents.
  • Q: What is the decimal equivalent for a steel gage thickness?
    A: Prior to 1970, sheet steel thickness was referred to by the term "gage". ASTM and ANSI currently do not list gage numbers in their standards. Like many generic terms, gage (or gauge) is ingrained in many vocabularies as a term for steel thickness.

    In our industry, some of the most commonly used and referenced steel thicknesses are:

  • 18 gage = 0.042" (1.0mm)
  • 16 gage = 0.053" (1.3mm)
  • 14 gage = 0.067" (1.7mm)
  • 12 gage = 0.093" (2.3mm)

    The term "gage" and Gauge" are used interchangeably.

  • Q: Are frames available with concave or convex face surfaces.
    A: Frames with highly unusual convex, concave, curved, stepped and radius features where once very typical especially with the manufacturer Pioneer industries.

    Availability of these types of face profiles would be determined after a review of the requested requirements.

    Q: Are 12 gage steel frame available?
    A: 12 gauge frames are certainly available. I consider a 12 gauge frame standard for all high abuse, high use applications and certainly when 14 gauge doors are used. I like to couple a 12 gauge frame with galvanizing to create an all but indestructible foundation for my door and hardware. Occasionally there are limitations of what can be created because of the thickness which is .1046" thick (that is thicker than residential hinge). Be sure to specify the correct hanging device when using 12 ga frames/14 ga doors (no .134 hinges and likely only pivots or heavy duty continuous hinges).
    Q: What is a 45° Hospital Stop?
    A: Hospital Stops are available as either:

  • 45° Hospital Stop - the stop of the frame terminates at a 45° angle
  • 90° Hospital Stop - the stop of the frame terminates at a 90° angle

    The type of hospital stop is a specified option. Both types of hospital stops are used and specified on all types of healthcare facilities and usually dictated by job economics.

    The purpose of the hospital stop is to facilitate a cleaner environment by reducing the stop and soffit running all the way to the bottom of the jamb so that with the decreased quantity of inside corners the ability to keep the bottom of the frame and floor area clean is enhanced.

  • Q: Why is a bituminous back-coating used?
    A: Some architectural specifications require steel frames to be back-coated with a bituminous coating for corrosion protection or sound control. It is commonly specified to be used in conditions for hollow metal frames that are to be grout filled and when using anti-freezing agents in the plaster or mortar.

    Bituminous is a term for a coating or emulsion containing fibrous or non-fibrous asphalt. Other than a few selective uses unrelated to steel frames, it is not readily available. A more modern replacement for this material is automotive undercoating. Undercoat is a very common item to use in the backside of frames and the inverted bottom channels of doors to prevent rust in exterior applications especially where salt is used.

    It is recommended that this coating be applied either in the distributors shop in the field at time of installation. Please be mindful, this coating never fully dries, leaving a dark residue that can be transferred to other parts of the frame.

    Q: Can you sell me a door and a frame that is AIS compliant?
    A: Absolutely - AIS is an acronym for the American Iron and Steel Requirement which states (I am summarizing my understanding):

    ...all of the iron and steel products used in the project will be and or have been produced in the United States in a manner that complies with the American Iron and Steel Requirement.

    The contractor will provide any further verified information certification or assurance of compliance with this paragraph or information necessary to support a waiver.

    In summary this means that we can accept orders for doors and frames and guarantee compliance with the AIS and provide documentation that the material provided is compliant in the form of a document commonly called a Certificate of Conformance.

    We first saw these requirements starting in the year 2020 and it seems to center around municipalities and their water distribution systems (at least to date).

    If you have any further questions on this matter please feel free to reach out to us.

    Q: Can a transom frame have a removable transom bar?
    A: Removable transom bars are available for non-rated frames.

  • A closed section mullion available.
  • Special clips to attach to frame sold separately.

    Removable transom bars are not approved or available for:

  • Fire rated openings
  • Florida Building Code (FBC) openings
  • Miami Dade County (NOA) openings
  • Q: What is the standard undersize for transom panels?
    A: Steel transom panels are available:

    1 3/4" thick panels - supplied in L-Series (L20, L18 or L16-Series) laminated construction. Recommended down sizing is as follows:

    Without Transom Bar

  • 3/16" on Width
  • 1/8" on Height

    With Transom Bar

  • 3/16" on Width
  • 3/16" on Height
  • Q: What is a U-Factor?
    A: The U-Factor, R-Value and K-Thermal Rating are measurements of thermal transmission through building products.

    U-Factor: Overall co-efficient of heat transmission passage through a built-up panel section. Technically, it is heat transmission in BTU per hour per square foot per degree Fahrenheit of temperature difference from air to air for a complete panel sectional.

  • The lower the U-factor, the better the insulation).

    R-Value: Thermal resistance is a measure of ability to retard heat flow. R is an expression of the total resistance to heat flow through a complete panel section or construction assembly. “R” represents a value of the thermal resistance, per hour per square foot of a typical panel section. The R-Factor is the numerical reciprocal of the U-factor.

  • The higher the R, the higher the insulating value.

    K-Thermal Rating: Conductivity (K) is the amount of heat that passes through a homogenous material one inch thick and one square foot in area per hour. Values of K are expressed in BTU per hour (the lower the K, the higher the insulating value). The K unit is for a single component material one inch thick and one square foot in area. Therefore, it does not apply to a 1-3/4” thick door panel consisting of several materials. (Conductivity is not a method of measuring heat transmission through built up panels.)

  • Q: What does the term "Reveal" mean?
    A: Reveal is the distance or measurement from the face of the door out to the face of the frame on the push side of the door.

    Other related terms:

  • Door face - The exposed surface of door visible when the door is closed.
  • Frame Face - The exposed part of frame visible when the door is closed (also referred to as trim).
  • Push side of door - Door face on stop side of frame side of door you must push on to open
  • Pull side of door – Door face on hinge side of door side of door you must pull a handle, lever or knob to open side where hinge barrels are visible opposite of the hinge side
  • Q: Viewed the youtube video hosted by Richard Howard on how to determine steel door manufacturer by hinge location. He references a pdf file on subject but we are unable to locate. Could you direct us to the file please.
    A: On the page as seen here:

    Click Here

    Scroll down to the bottom and click next page

    Search for the video titled (this is the sixth from the bottom and all of the links to the documents reference are there)

    How to identify the brand of steel door you have

    Q: What is the ANSI A115.1 Government 86 Door Prep for the L9000 lock?
    A: The ANSI A115.1 Mortise Lock Prep can be seen here:

    Download File

    This door prep requires the N escutcheon with the L283-029 spacer kit to keep the springcage from falling into the door. Spacer kits are shipped with every N escutcheon order.

    Q: Is there a metal entry door identification chart for doors larger than 8 feet? I have a 9.5 tall door. Your video shows measurements for doors up to 8 feet only.
    A: There is not an established chart that I'm aware of that goes past 8 foot tall. While we can certainly make an educated guess as to what that would be because the top hinge and the bottom hinge would stay in a fixed position - the middle two hinges would be spaced evenly is generally how the industry handles this type of non standard door height.

    You're always best off getting the manufacturer's locations for this material in writing or defining what you would like the manufacturer to use in terms of locations.

    Q: Door hitting the strike jamb?
    A: According to Allegion:

    If the door hits the frame (or rubs on the rabbet of the head or jamb) the frame is out of square and improperly installed.

  • Door edge rubbing on the rabbet - shimming the hinges may resolve the problem
  • Door edge hitting the frame face - shimming the hinges may resolve the problem however frame replacement may be required
  • In adverse conditions the frame may have to be replaced

    Drywall Slip-on frames (DW or K-Series) may be adjusted using the compression anchors to re-square the frame

    Field shimming of the frame is the responsibility of the installing contractor and is a part of the installation process.

  • Q: What is the hinge backset for 1 3/4" thick door?
    A: 1/4" is typical

    Hinge backset is the dimension from the leading edge of the hinge to either the stop on the frame or to the stop face (push side) of the door.

  • For operating clearance, the hinge backset on the door is 1/16" less (smaller) than the hinge backset on the frame.
  • The method or measuring hinge backset varies between SDI and NAAMM/HMMA. Refer to the notes section of this solution.
  • SDI measures to the edge of the hinge
  • NAAMM/HMMA measures to the edge of the cutout

  • For 1 3/4" doors prepared with 4 1/2" or 5" butt hinges (Steelcraft standard hinge backset):
  • Frame = 5/16" (leading edge of hinge to the frame stop)
  • Door = 1/4" (leading edge of hinge to the stop face of the door)

  • For special thickness doors (over 1 3/4" thick): Hinge size must be specified
  • Frame = Backset and Hinge size must be specified
  • Door = Steelcraft does not supply special thickness doors

  • For 1 3/8" doors prepared with 3 1/2" (Steelcraft standard hinge backset):
  • Frame = 5/16" (leading edge of hinge to the frame stop)
  • Door = Steelcraft does not supply 1 3/8" doors.
  • Q: What is Steelcrafts standard hinge locations for a 68" high frame from head to top of each hinge?
    A: The location to the top of hinge will vary depending on hinge size used.

    68" Frame with 1 1/2 pair of hinges (top to top):

  • For 4 1/2" hinges from the head to top of each hinge is 7 1/2", 37 7/16" & 67 3/8"
  • For 5" hinges from the head to top of each hinge is 7 1/4", 37 3/16" & 67 1/8"

    Please see our "Hinge Location Chart" as seen here:

    Download File

  • Q: Can an additional jamb anchor be used as a base anchor on fire rated frames?
    A: Yes, an additional jamb anchor can be used at the bottom of the frame in lieu of the typical (adjustable or weld-in) base anchor in fire rated frames.

  • This is limited to the anchor designed for use in wood or steel stud walls and frames installed into existing masonry walls using expansion anchors.
  • The anchor must be located a maximum of 6" from bottom of the jamb.
  • This applies to all frames fire rated and non-fire rated.
  • Q: Are adjustable base anchors provided with frames that are prepped for existing opening anchors?
    A: No, an adjustable base anchor is not supplied on frames with existing opening anchors. The anchor design for use in existing masonry walls, is a pierce and dimple in the frame soffit for 3/8" diameter x 5" long screws which are bolted and secure to wall. Steelcraft for instance starts from the bottom of frame the first anchor is at 2 1/2", therefore an adjustable base anchor cannot be used.
    Q: Can KD 3 piece drywall type frames be used in high traffic areas?
    A: The question might be better posed is ought they be used because they can certainly be installed but should they be installed, the answer would be no - it would be best to never use a knockdown 3-piece frame also known as a slip-on frame which slides onto the wall with little to no direct anchoring to the wall studs.

    These frame types are notorious for coming out of square allowing the door to not operate correctly because the frame is no longer true plumb level and square. Hes knocked down frame types are usually used only in instances where the proper amount of lead time has not been scheduled to permit the installation of welded frames which are always superior in all construction types.

    Q: What height should a lock or deadbolt be installed?
    A: According to ANSI specifications for cylindrical or mortise locks:

  • The lock strike centerline should be 40 5/16" from the bottom of the frame with the lock in relation to the strike.
  • The deadbolt strike centerline should be 48" from the bottom of the frame.
  • Q: What are the door cores A, B, C, D, E & F per SDI 100?
    A: These references are from an old and outdated SDI 100 specification. The new specification SDI 100 ANSI A-250.8 does not contain letter designations for core material.

    Core constructions designations are as follows:

  • A = Kraft Honeycomb
  • B = Polyurethane
  • C = Polystyrene
  • D = Utilized Steel Grid
  • E = Mineral Fiberboard
  • F = Vertical Steel Stiffeners
  • Q: Is Rigid Cellular Polyisocyanurate Foam Core the same as Urethane Core?
    A: Polyisocyanurate foam (polyiso) is modified polyurethane foam but offers greater dimensional stability over a wider service temperature range.

    Polyisocyanurate foam is specifically formulated to provide excellent physical properties without the use of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) or hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) blowing agents and is in compliance with the Montreal Protocol and the Clean Air Act.

    Q: What is a communicating frame?
    A: Communicating Frames are hollow metal frame fabricated such that a door is installed in each rabbet of a double rabbeted frame (2 doors total) to facilitate dual access and control of the opening, i.e. hotel/motel suites and some acoustical applications.

    Communicating frame are primarily used in hospitality/hotel building to separate two (2) adjoining rooms.

    Applications:

  • Single doors: Two (2) doors are hung in one framed opening and each door is locked from the occupied side of each room.
  • Double doors: Four (4) doors are hung in one framed opening and pair door is locked from the occupied side of each room.
  • Most common is to use two 1 3/4" thick doors.
  • The opening can be fire rated up to 3 hours maximum size 4080 single and 8080 pair.
  • Q: How many anchors are in a frame?
    A: Basic guidelines are as follows:

    Anchor Quantities:

  • • 3 per jamb through 7’-6” height
  • • 4 per jamb over 7’-6” to 12’-0” height
  • • 1 adjustable base anchor per jamb

    Anchor Locations:

  • • Locate all anchors on hinge jamb as close to top of all hinge reinforcements as possible
  • • Locate anchors on strike jamb in the corresponding position as the hinge jamb
  • • Base anchors are located at the bottom of each jamb
  • Q: Where is the RA closer reinforcement located on a frame for a Regular Arm Closer?
    A: Optional closer reinforcements are located at 3" from hinge jamb to the beginning of the reinforcement plate. This applies to Regular Arm, Parallel Arm, Top Jamb.

  • Regular Arm (RA) closer reinforcements are welded into face of frame header on the pull side of opening.
  • Top Jamb (TJ) closer reinforcements are welded into face of frame header on the push side opening.
  • Parallel Arm (PA) closer reinforcements are welded into soffit of frame header. Standard reinforcement plates for these surface mounted closers are 14 gage and 14" long.
  • Q: Hello is it anyway I can get a door tested to receive a fire rate approval?
    A: This is not my area of expertise but you would contact Underwriters Laboratory

    Click Here

    or Intertek Testing

    Click Here

    - this is precisely the business that these folks are involved in.

    Q: What are ANSI BHMA hardware grades?
    A: The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association (BHMA) have developed durability, strength and performance standards for every type of door hardware on the market.

    Please see this screen capture of gradings and the reference standard for the common types of graded hardware:

    View Image

    To gain a better understanding or the grading system, please refer to Allegion’s document titled “Understanding BHMA grading & testing” as seen here:

    Download File

    Q: Where is the Fire Label located on a door and a frame?
    A: Fire labels (UL, ITS/WHI or FM) are located as follows:

    Butt Hinges and Pivots:

  • On the doors the fire label is located on the hinge edge between the top and 2nd hinge preparation.
  • On the frames the fire label is located on the hinge jamb between the top and 2nd hinge preparation.

    Continuous Hinges:

    Full Mortise Continuous Hinge:

  • On the frame the fire label would be located on the rabbet of head approximately 8" from the hinge jamb.
  • On the door, the label is located in the top channel approximately 8" from the hinge jamb. If a top cap is installed, it must be removed to view the label. On the jobsite, removing the top cap is the responsibility of the building inspector.

    Full Surface Continuous Hinges:

  • On the doors the fire label is located on the hinge edge between the top and 2nd hinge preparation.
  • On the frames the fire label is located on the hinge jamb between the top and 2nd hinge preparation.
  • Q: How many compression anchors are provide per jamb on DW-Series frames?
    A: Generally 1, at the top of each jamb, but in rare instances it can be more than one.
    Q: What are the standard door and frame clearances?
    A: To determine Actual Door Size, the following values are subtracted from nominal door size (frame opening/order size)

    Actual Door Size: The largest measured width by height of the door leaf as manufactured. Equal to the nominal door size minus design clearance. Also referred to as Net Door Size.

    Standard Door Heights:

    All doors - Height downsizing:

  • total 7/8"; 1/8" top, 3/4" bottomv

    Standard Door Width Downsizing: Bevel edge doors - Width downsizing: Single door, active leaf and inactive leaf with astragal Total 3/16" Wide inactive leaf without astragal Total 3/32"

    Square edge doors - Width downsizing: Single door, active leaf and inactive leaf with astragal Total 7/32" Wide inactive leaf without astragal Total 1/8"

  • Q: Can louvers be installed in fire rated transom frames?
    A: NO - Louvers are not approved for installation in a fire rated transom / side panel frames.

  • NFPA Pamphlet 80 - paragraph # 6.3.4.4 states “Louvers shall not be installed in either transom or side panels”.
  • UL - does not allow the installation of louvers in transom or side panel frames.
  • ITS/WHI - does not allow the installation of louvers in transom or side panel frames.
  • Q: What is the available R-value for the polystyrene and polyurethane cores for single metal doors? We have a spec requiring R-11, but I don’t know how high they go for these types of doors.
    A: The answer to this question depends on the manufacturer and their series of door.

    When Steelcraft

    Click Here

    was asked this question, they provided to following outline:

  • B18 Series (Steel Stiffeners)
    U-Factor = 0.50 R-Value = 2.01

  • B16 Series (Steel Stiffeners)
    U-Factor = 0.53 R-Value = 1.89

  • L18 Series (Honeycomb)
    U-Factor = 0.56 R-Value = 1.80

  • L18 Series (Polystyrene)
    U-Factor = 0.38 R-Value = 2.64

  • L18 Series (Polyurethane)
    U-Factor = 0.36 R-Value = 2.81

  • L16 Series (Honeycomb)
    U-Factor = 0.57 R-Value = 1.74

  • L16 Series (Polystyrene)
    U-Factor = 0.39 R-Value = 2.54

  • L16 Series (Polyurethane)
    U-Factor = 0.38 R-Value = 2.67

  • CE18 Series (Polystyrene)
    U-Factor = 0.41 R-Value = 2.44

  • H16 Series (Honeycomb)
    U-Factor = 0.60 R-Value = 1.67

  • H16 Series (Polystyrene)
    U-Factor = 0.42 R-Value = 2.36

  • A14 Series (Honeycomb)
    U-Factor = 0.78 R-Value = 1.28

    I would be happy to engage in a further discussion regarding your requirements so please feel free to reach out at any time.

  • Q: Can steel frames be installed after the wall board is installed in stud wall applications?
    A: According to Steelcraft

    DW and K-Series frames are designed to slip onto a stud wall after the wall is finished (painted, wall papered, etc).

  • Walls can be either wood stud or steel stud
  • Used only for interior applications
  • In the industry, DW and K-Series frames are referred to as "Drywall Slip-on Frames"

    F, FN, MU-Series are designed to be installed prior to the drywall being installed and finished.

  • Walls can be masonry, wood stud or steel stud
  • Frames are installed during the wall construction
  • Used only for both interior and exterior applications

    FE and DE-Series are designed to be installed prior to the drywall being installed and finished.

  • Walls can be masonry, wood stud or steel stud
  • Frames are installed during the wall construction
  • Used only for interior applications
  • (Required, used to email you once question is answered.)
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