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    Home > Complete Door Units > Single Door Units > Single Hollow Metal Door & Hollow Metal Frame > Single Metal Door and Frame Complete Unit

 
Single Metal Door and Frame Complete Unit
 

Metal Door and Metal Frame Complete Unit

Single Metal Door and Frame Complete Unit

 
Manufacturer: ABS
Price: $516.42
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Standard - ships within 14 business days.
 
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Questions and Answers
Q: I have some doors and side panels that need replaced and the hinge locations apear to be Kewanee by the chart I have. Is there a way I can send pics and sizes to see if they are available?
A: Please do. Send your photos to the email address on the Contact Us page here:

http://absupply.net/about_us.aspx

Q: We talked about a metal frame that is 2" wide to the left and right of the door.

Does that mean if we have a 2-6 door, the outside of the frame will be 34".

We are fitting these 2 doors in between 2 houses and the owner wants to maximize door width, but I have to make sure we can still fit the frame in that space. We have a masonry structure on one side and a combination of wood and masonry on the other structure. The other thing I mentioned was that we will install wood framing to the exist structures to give us something to attach the door frame to.

What method do you recommend in attaching the metal door frame to the wood framing? Some sort of large wood screw? Can you provide the fasteners, holes and dimpling in the frame?

If my dimension assumption in the 1st paragraph is correct, please price a 2-6 x 7-0 and a 2-10 x 7-0 door, frame, and all the parts you priced the first time.

A: I will happily quote these doors for you. I can quoted this with 2" jamb faces or I can quote the jamb faces as custom, say 1" (this will allow a maximizing of door width). Are you interested in a true "maximizing" of door width by considering custom jambs, or is the 4" less than RO for nominal door width good enough? There will be follow up questions but once we have this completed, we will arrive at precisely what you are looking for.

Please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: Give me an idea how much more cost would be added by going to 1" jamb faces and the added time to get the custom frames. Timing is important for us. I would like to get these doors in about a week to 1 1/2 weeks. I the 1" frames add time, the "4" less than RO" is going to be good enough. Can you get this pricing on the 2 doors to me today? I want to put this to bed with the owner over the weekend.
A: The custom profile material, where cost is less a concern than lead time, is typically 2 - weeks to ship and typically another week in transit.

I have sent a quote to your email for the 2 - openings as discussed.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take pride in our technical expertise so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: If ordering doors on your site, can they be picked up at you Prospect Heights location to avoid the steep shipping charges?
A: In general the answer is yes. What specifically are you looking for?

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take pride in our technical expertise, as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: Please see attached hardware & keying schedules: a) What does this code, “HNTCB” mean? b) I’m not a hardware guy and I don't know what "1" Bitted means. Does it mean that temporary constriction cores are provided? Can you help me out AND thanks for any help you can lend… Best Regards,
A: In this context, HNYCB is certainly an abbreviation for Honeycomb

1 bitted means the cylinder is pinned all number 1 pins (and naturally the key is cut all ones therefore th bitting for those cylinders would be 111111).

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise, as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: How do you specify insulation in Single metal door w/metal frame?
A: Great Question. All Metal doors on this page will be Polystyrene core. Other cores are available such as honeycomb, polyurethane, steel stiffened. mineral rock wool, temperature rise/mineral fiberboard. If you have a requirement for one of these optional cores, please reach out to our sales department for a quote.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise, as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with.

Q: Rich, My house was built in 1957. An exterior doorway has a steel door jamb with two hinges that are built into the jamb. They appear to have been installed in a slot behind the face of the jamb. Jamb is set in a brick wall with mortar filled in between the bricks and jamb. The top hinge (and the area of the jamb where it was attached) has literally torn loose from the jamb and must be replaced. I can not find any information (or products or person) that describes how to replace hinges and repair the jamb in this scenario. This doorway is currently unusable and must be repaired as soon as possible. Do you have any products or information I can use? Can you help? Thanks, Pat [removed]
A: Pat - thank you for the email. I have a short fix in mind using off the shelf hardware and a longer, more difficult, but more elegant fix in mind. Please email me a handful of photos of the door, frame and comprised area. I will detail the options I see best suited for your application.
Q: How do I install a steel frame - I emailed you photos.
A: Robert - I received your photos and have prepared this video response -

Click Here

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise, as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

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if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with. If this answer was helpful - please consider following us on Twitter

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Q: Rich, Sherwin Williams attitude grey. I’m sure I read some place for the manufacture warranty you had indicated a certain gloss. But I’m unable to find this. Can you advise Thanks Julie
A: Thank you very much for the email and I very much appreciate you asking it a good question prior to proceeding with painting the door.

First the manufacturers warranty for the doors you purchased is here:

Download File

However there is very specific information regarding gloss paint on the surface of hollow metal doors and frames.

According to ANSI/SDI A250.8-2014 Revision of ANSI/SDI A250.8-2003 as published on The Steel Door Institute site:

Aesthetics

The production of steel doors and frames relies on a variety of manufacturing processes including spot welding, projection welding, arc welding ground smooth, grinding, filling, etc. These processes may result in a show-through after application of finished paint. These characteristics are inherent in production and are not to be considered as manufacturing defects.

The show-through characteristics increase as the paint gloss increases. This standard recommends a maximum paint gloss rating of 20% reflectance, measured using a 60° gloss meter, which should be suitable for most applications. Translucent paints may emphasize show-through characteristics and their use is not recommended.*

This document is to be followed even in the instance where the manufacturers warranty lacks this secific language.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise (something Amazon can not provide) as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

Click Here

if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with. If this answer was helpful -

please consider following us on Twitter

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or liking our page on Facebook

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* ANSI/SDI A250.8-2014 Revision of ANSI/SDI A250.8-2003
Click Here

Q: Is the primer oil based or water based?
A: Julie - the primer on the doors and frames for your order, as manufacturered Karpen Steel Products as seen here:

Click Here

is Oil based primer.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise (something Amazon can not provide) as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

Click Here

if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with. If this answer was helpful -

please consider following us on Twitter

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or liking our page on Facebook

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Q: What is the maximum glass light size on a 3 hour (180 minute) fire rated door?
A: Maximum glass light sizes for 3 hour fire doors is as follows:

Wire glass: not approved for use in 3 hour fire doors.

Ceramic glass: UL & ITS/WH allow one (1) light with 100 square inches (.06 square meters) maximum of glass is permitted on 3 hour Maximum width of 12" (305 mm) or height of 33" (838 mm).

L, B, & T series doors if Firelite or other 3 hour listed glazing material is used.

Some local building codes do not recognize the use of glass lights in 3 hour fire doors.

Historically, a 3 hour fire door could not include a glass light.

Recent code changes and fire tests have allowed for the use of listed glass lights designs.

Multiple glass lights are not allowed on 3 hour fire doors.

Q: What is a KD frame?
A: Knock Down (KD) frames: KD frames are designed, manufactured and supplied with integral miters which include all notches, interlocking corner tabs and slots to allow for field assembly and do not require corer welding prior to installation. When KD frames are used, corner welding is optional and when specified. The terms KD, 3 - piece knocked down, Knock Down, Knocked Down and "break-down" are used interchangeably. Practically all frames can be ordered as knocked down frames most notable with the exception of 12 guage frames (which must be factory welded).

While frame anchors must always be specified, it is generally inferred that when someone speaks of or refers to a frame as being “knocked down” they are inferring that they want the frame to include the integrated anchoring system typically known as “drywall anchors” and more often known within the industry has compression anchors and an example of this anchor type can be seen here:

Click Here

Compression anchors are always welded into the rear side of the jamb and always have the net result of a specific rough opening requirement in relationship to the nominal door size. Most typically the rough opening size, however not always and you must always confirm with your supplier prior to framing walls, is that you would increase the rough opening by ¾” on each vertical side and ¾” at the header meaning a 3 foot by 7 foot nominal door size would have a rough opening requirement of 37-½” by 84-¾”

Q: What is a welded frame?
A: A welded frame is one that will start life out as a knock down or three piece frame. What turns it into a welded frame is that the distributor or manufacturer or point-of-purchase will provide the assembly service for you - taking a frame that is in multiple pieces and assembling it to one unified piece.

There are different definitions that qualify a frame to be assembled such as a frame that is literally just assembled where the tab and slot construction of the frame, inherent to a masonry type frame, is completed where the distributor will connect the pieces together and at least provide them in a sense where they are now in one piece. If a client were to order a frame as a knock down the prior mentioned assembly is always performed prior to installation. The more common way to classify a frame as welded is to take that same prior step and then weld the frame behind or in the throat of the frame so that the pieces cannot come disassembled however this method wood leave the mitre of the frame intact or visible. A step beyond this would be to take that same frame that's been assembled and then welded with weld points behind or in the throat of the frame but then also weld continuously the miter that is in the face of the frame and on all four corners, if it's a three-sided frame, and then grind that weld down smooth or flush, sand it and then paint it that will give it a seamless look where the miters have been welded closed. This of course is the most common way to do this as well and if you hear the terminology “Full face Welded and Ground Smooth” this method is what is being referred to. A third way where it's called saw cut and welded where the manufacturer generally will take pieces and then cut them on their bandsaw or some manufacturing piece of equipment and then literally weld the frame continuously from the miter on the face to the rabbit in the back and dress the weld properly - some people consider this a more complete or total method of welding however it's only engaged at the manufacturing process when you are creating custom frames using pre-manufactured materials in my experience.

It is always advantageous to have the frame(s) welded prior to installation regardless of who provides the assembly / welding service (assuming the individual(s) is qualified) as the potential for the opening to stay square is significantly improved over the life expectancy of the doorway.

However requiring welded frames at a project will specifically alter the course of construction in any given job because a welded frame needs to be in place typically at the time, or before initial wall construction occurs (an advantage of having the frames on site prior to wall construction is that the contractor can confirm accuracy but also that there is no delay in the tradesman coming on the job site to proceed with wall construction), whereas a 3-piece knockdown frame is done after the wall construction has occurred. Always plan accordingly to allow the distributor or manufacturer ample time to produce welded frames and have them arrive at the job site prior to wall construction occurring.

It can be also understood that welding frames are used in all instances when cost and scheduling are not an obstacle and that 3-piece knockdown frames are generally ordered when cost and timing is not favorable to the flow of construction. Speaking plainly you do not want a 3-piece knockdown frame on the job site when your budget and schedule will allow for a welded frame It's not down frames are known to come out of square in a short amount of time.

I offer as proof of this of when you enter your favorite coffee shop and you can see that there is a compression anchor installed at the top of the frame (a telltale sign that the frame initially was a knockdown 3 piece drywall type) and you'll notice that within one or two years of initial construction that the frame will no longer be square and plumb, and that the door will be making improper contact with the top of the jamb. There is no elegant way to mitigate this type of problem which will lead to damage to the door the hardware and when adorn frame no longer work and an improperly functioning door opening is more prone to vandalism or abuse as the user is not necessarily concerned with the healthy operation of the door.

Is there a follow up question that we can perhaps attempt to answer? We take deep pride in our technical expertise (something Amazon can not provide) as we know it separates us from our competition, so don't hesitate to ask.

Please reply to this email or contact our sales department here:

Click Here

if we can assist you by answering further questions or with entering this order and please let us know if there is anything else we can help with. If this answer was helpful -

please consider following us on Twitter

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or liking our page on Facebook

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Thank you for your consideration.

Q: What is a plaster guard?
A: A plaster guard is a piece of metal that has been welded behind a hardware preparation in a steel frame - most commonly the hinge and the strike but a plaster guard can be of any size and shape required to close off the preparation in a steel frame from the intrusion of any of the wall material from interfering with the operation and installation of the hardware and also from material of the wall construction working its way and exiting out through the frame through those Hardware preparations.

A plaster guard is also primarily used when a welded (or 3 - piece frame) frame is put in place and concrete and mortar is used with the appropriate anchors during installation. The plaster guard prevents the intrusion of the grout and concrete from interfering with the preparations in the steel frame for the hardware. Imagine for a moment that if you installed a steel frame onto a new construction cement block wall and used concrete/mortar/grout with corrugated T anchors - without the plaster guard being properly in place that grout would certainly fill all of the drilled and tapped areas in the hinge reinforcing play where the hinge would ultimately need to attach to making it practically impossible to attach the screws into the tapped holes.

One interesting thing that we sometimes will do is if that there is a steel frame that's going to be installed and there has been no plaster guard made available such as what you would see with a continuous geared hinge installation we would take a three-quarter inch thick or so piece of rigid insulation and simply tape it behind the frame before the installation of the frame to the wall such that the grout is eliminated from intruding into that area where we would ultimately have to drill and tap holes for fastening hardware.

A plaster guard is also known as a Dust Cover Box, Masonry Guard, Mortar Guard, Plaster Guard; Grout Guard.

The answer to this question is not to be considered complete nor was there any research done and was answered just using the first most obvious and common applications of what a plaster guard is.

It is typical and common that drywall type frames do not have plaster guards installed because there is no function of grout or mortar involved in a typical drywall frame - also known as interior - wall Construction.

Q: Hi Rich can you please quote these doors and frame, swing clear hinges , brushed door sweeps,astragal and cover plate? 5'8" x 811/2 . I believe it was Ceco but I guess it can be anything?

Photos here:

Click Here

Click Here

Click Here

Click Here

Thanks Jim any questions give me a call.

A: Jim - our conversation led us in a direction earlier where you find it often where you are replacing doors and frames because of a top hinge failure in a swing clear application.

I have sent over a quote to your email but I substituted for continuous geared swing clear hinges for full mortise swing clear hinges per your photos as I believe you are better off installing continuous geared swing clear hinges right from the initial installation because as we discussed there are not reinforcing top pivots such as the Markar B1923 US2G Full Surface Reinforcing Pivot as seen here:

Click Here

When you need to mitigate that sort of problem and have a swing clear hinge.

Q: Hi Rich you mentioned that there was some reinforcing to do for the Roton hinge - can you send me some installation instructions so I will know what I am looking at as far as time.
A: The mention of reinforcing is done internally in the steel door and frame (nothing you will need to do additional) which means that you're not going to have just the thin edge of the door to screw too but there's going to be additional steel welded inside of the construction of the door as well as in the back side of the frame. Translation you're going to have a lot of steel to drill through to hang those hinges properly however the hinges are going to include 12/24 screws with a self drilling point. The additional labor is going to come in the fact then I would probably calculate an additional 3 hours to simply contend with the fact that you're going to have rather than 24 screws to install per door you're going to have probably double that.
Q: Does it add to the cost of the frame and would you agree it might be better to set the hinges before hand to save some time in the field right?
A: I priced it that way - you are all set. Regarding attaching the hinge until the frame is set and you're actually hanging a door so that you can margin off of the actual installation of the frame. Having said that if you were to take the unit and in your shop build it as a complete prehung or the frame is welded and the two doors are hung in the frame on the hinges and you had welded reinforcements at the bottom of the frame that you would remove after installation that might make a lot of difference once in the field but you know as well as I do that when you get the frame set to the wall you kind of margin the frame to the door and the door to the frame type scenario. I remember about 15 years or maybe 20 years ago when I first installed a continuous hinge my very first one ever it took me only one hour and I have never done it before it's really super simple to put one of these in your just going to drill lots of holes with those self drilling screws is the bottom line I say Jump Right In the water's fine - LOL
Q: What is 5, 10 and equal (NAAMM/HMMA) hinge spacing?
A: "5, 10 and equal" Hinge Spacing: The industry terminology which usually refers to the Custom (NAAMM/HMMA) Door hinge locations.

This location dictates:

  • Top Hinge - located 5" from the underside of the frame head (top of door opening) to the top of the top hinge.
  • Bottom Hinge - located 10" from the bottom of the frame (bottom of door opening) to the bottom of the bottom hinge.
  • Middle (center) Hinge(s) - all other hinges are equally spaced.

We can supply "5, 10 and equal" hinge spacing as an option when specified.

Q: How are Butt Hinges located?
A: Certain manufacturers locates all butt hinges from the top of the door to the centerline of each hinge as standard practice:

  • Locating hinges to the center line of the hinge keeps all hinge locations the same (at a given door height) regardless of hinge size.
  • All variations in door height will vary the hinge locations accordingly.

If top or bottom of hinge locations are required:

  • Special (non-standard) orders can be submitted but the distributor is responsible for coordinating any changes in hinge sizes.
  • In this situation, doors and frames prepared for 5" hinges have a different location than 4 1/2" hinges.

Industry Hinge Locations - Standard (SDI) versus Custom (NAAMM/HMMA):

  • Standard (SDI) hinge locations are located based on the centerline of the hinge.
  • Custom (NAAMM/HMMA) hinge locations are located based on the top or bottom of the hinge.
Q: What types of steel are used in commercial steel doors?
A: The types of steel that are used in hollow metal door and frame construction can be reviewed here:

  • Cold Rolled Steel (CRS) is suitable for most interior applications, is uncoated steel and requires a coat of primer.

  • Galvannealed Steel (A) is basic steel coated with an iron-zinc alloy. It provides excellent corrosion protection when combined with a coating of quality prime paint and is adequate for most interior and exterior applications. SDI recommends use of the A Type, both A40 and A60, for primer adhesion. A60 is superior to A40 for inhibiting rust.

  • Galvanized Steel (G) is basic steel treated with a full zinc alloy. It provides superior rust protection but has poor adhesion properties for prime or finish paint. Even though galvanized (G90) steel is often specified for causal areas and areas of excessive corrosion, it is not recommend because of inferior primer adhesion properties, poor welding capabilities and excessive weld show.
Q: How many compression anchors are provide per jamb on the drywall frames?
A: Generally speaking for drywall frames with integrated compression anchors for jamb depths up to and including 9" - one (1) compression anchor is furnished per jamb

for jamb depths over 9" - two (2) compression anchor are furnished per jamb on the same horizontal center line.

The compression anchor in the jamb soffits approximately 4" down from the head on each jamb regardless of door opening height.

Q: What is the minimum dimension from the edge of the door to a glass light cutout?
A: Generally speaking, and this definition does not work in all instances so consult your door manufacturer, we can advise general guidelines as follows:

Minimum dimensions to cutouts for glass lights:

  • Vertical edge of door to edge of cutout = 5 29/32"
  • Top of door to top of cutout = 6"
  • Bottom of door to bottom of cutout = 10"
Reinforcing channels are recommended for the following applications:
  • Required on fire rated openings
  • Required on all B-series doors
  • When cutout exceeds 36"
  • Abusive applications
  • Reinforcing channels will be installed at the factory when required or requested.
Doors can be prepared for cutouts either at the factory or in the distributors shop provided the distributor is a "licensed machiner"for field installed glass light kits.
Q: Can Drywall Slip-on frames be welded?
A: Drywall Slip-on frames are recommended and designed to be installed as KD (Knock Down) assemblies and not recommended to be welded (SUA). If a DW-Series or K-Series is welded prior to installation it is no longer considered a "Drywall Slip-on" frame due to the installation process.

Universal anchors are designed to be field snapped into MU-Series frames but will also snap into Drywall Slip-on frames and is only done:

  • If required by the architect
  • A distributor can use a DW of K series frame and convert it to a MU-Series frame construction. This would only be recommended if the jobsite requirements are critical.
  • In those applications Steelcraft recommends using the MU-Series frame which has a complete line of wall anchors.
  • Q: Can you provide frame installation instructions?
    A: It is always recommended to point installers to the industry installation manuals which are very comprehensive and are ANSI documents:

  • SDI (Steel Door Institute) installation manual can be found here: Download File
  • NAAMM/HMMA (Hollow Metal Manufacturers" Association) installation manual can be found here: Download File
  • Q: Can "toed in" or "toed out" jambs be adjusted?
    A: This condition (toed in or toed out jambs) is usually not found until the door is installed.

    Frames which have toed in or toed out jambs have been installed out of tolerance. It is the responsibility of the installing contractor to install all material in accordance with SDI or HMMA installation standards and tolerances. Frames which are installed out of the published tolerances must be adjusted or replaced by the installing contractor.

    Conventional Frames: - These frames are installed during the wall construction process and anchored/fastened directly to the wall construction. When toed in or toed out jambs are found:

  • Masonry wall applications - Frame usually must be removed and/or replaced
  • Stud wall applications - If the wall board is not attached, the frame may be able to be re-anchored and adjusted. If the wall board has been installed the frames usually must be removed and new frames installed.

    Drywall Slip-on Frames - These frames can usually adjusted by the installing contractor. Recommended adjustment processes are found on pages 16 thru 17 in SDI-122 which can be viewed here:

    Click Here

  • Q: Can out of plumb (twisted) frames be adjusted?
    A: Out of plumb (also referred to as twisted) frames usually cannot be adjusted.

    "Out of Plumb or Twisted frames (or jambs)" is a condition created by improper wall construction and/or improper installation and anchoring methods. The faces of the two jambs (hinge and strike) are not in the same imaginary plane as the door face. This can be checked by using a level and/or plumb bob. Frames do not have adjustments when it comes to “twist”.

    The “twist” condition is generally caused by the wall conditions. The frame jamb faces are prevented from being set in the same plane because the base of the walls (the bottom at each jamb) are out of plane to begin with.

    It is the responsibility of the installing contractor to install walls and  all door/frame material in accordance with SDI or HMMA installation standards and tolerances. Frames which are installed in out of plumb walls which exceed the published tolerances must be adjusted or replaced by the installing contractor. More information on "out of plumb" frames in found on pages 11 in SDI-122 which can be viewed here:

    Download File

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